What is known as the Second Great Migration?

In the context of the 20th-century history of the United States, the Second Great Migration was the migration of more than 5 million African Americans from the South to the Northeast, Midwest and West. It began in 1940, through World War II, and lasted until 1970.

What is the Second Great Migration and why did it take place?

Dire economic conditions in the South necessitated the move to the North for many black families. The expansion of industrial production and the further mechanization of the agricultural industry, in part, spurred the Second Great Migration following the end of World War II.

What were the first and second great migrations?

The First and Second Great Migrations (1916–1925, and 1940-1970) marked the exodus of African Americans from the South to escape segregationist Jim Crow laws and find economic opportunity in other regions of the United States.

Who is involved in the Second Great Migration?

About 4.3 million African Americans migrated out of the southern United States between 1940 and 1970, an exodus known as the Second Great Migration. The first Great Migration occurred when African Americans moved north in the first decades of the 1900s.

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What are the two waves of the Great Migration?

Some historians differentiate between a first Great Migration (1916–40), which saw about 1.6 million people move from mostly rural areas in the South to northern industrial cities, and a Second Great Migration (1940–70), which began after the Great Depression and brought at least 5 million people—including many

What was the first great migration?

The Great Migration was the mass movement of about five million southern blacks to the north and west between 1915 and 1960. During the initial wave the majority of migrants moved to major northern cities such as Chicago, Illiniois, Detroit, Michigan, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and New York, New York.

What caused the Great Migration?

What are the push-and-pull factors that caused the Great Migration? Economic exploitation, social terror and political disenfranchisement were the push factors. The political push factors being Jim Crow, and in particular, disenfranchisement. Black people lost the ability to vote.

Where do most black people live?

Cities with the highest percentage of African American people

Rank City Total African Americans
1 Detroit, MI 670,226
2 Gary, IN 75,282
4 Chester, PA 26,429
5 Miami Gardens, FL 81,776

Which two cities were the most popular destination during the Great Migration? New York and Chicago.

What was an impact of the Second Great Migration?

In the Second Great Migration, not only the Northeast and Midwest continued to be the destination of more than 5 million African Americans, but also the West as well, where cities like Los Angeles, Oakland, Phoenix, Portland, and Seattle offered skilled jobs in the defense industry.

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Why did the Second Great Awakening occur?

The Second Great Awakening was a U.S. religious revival that began in the late eighteenth century and lasted until the middle of the nineteenth century. … As a result of declining religious convictions, many religious faiths sponsored religious revivals. These revivals emphasized human beings’ dependence upon God.

Which were effects of the Second Great Migration in the 1960s?

Poverty, the lack of educational facilities for the children, rigid segregation and discrimination, and limited opportunities were all among the reasons that led some to look North. But the most important was the massive collapse of Southern agricultural employment.

What was the largest mass migration in US history?

It was noted that one in nine people living in America were located in california. This mass movement of people is considered the single largest migration in American History. And with it came advancement in wetern society, technology, and the formation of the United States as we know it.

Population movement