What was the great migration in simple terms?

The Great Migration was the relocation of more than 6 million African Americans from the rural South to the cities of the North, Midwest and West from about 1916 to 1970.

What is the great migration and why did it occur?

The primary factors for migration among southern African Americans were segregation, an increase in the spread of racist ideology, widespread lynching (nearly 3,500 African Americans were lynched between 1882 and 1968), and lack of social and economic opportunities in the South.

What was the purpose of the Great Migration?

The Great Migration was a massive movement of African Americans out of the South and into the North during the World War I era, around 1914-1920. Blacks moved to northern cities for the economic opportunity afforded by war conditions, but also to flee the overt racism and prejudice endemic in the South.

How would you describe the Great Migration?

The Great Migration was the movement of some six million African Americans from rural areas of the Southern states of the United States to urban areas in the Northern states between 1916 and 1970. It occurred in two waves, basically before and after the Great Depression.

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What was the Great Migration of 1915?

The Great Migration was the mass movement of about five million southern blacks to the north and west between 1915 and 1960. During the initial wave the majority of migrants moved to major northern cities such as Chicago, Illiniois, Detroit, Michigan, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and New York, New York.

Why did the Second Great Migration happen?

Dire economic conditions in the South necessitated the move to the North for many black families. The expansion of industrial production and the further mechanization of the agricultural industry, in part, spurred the Second Great Migration following the end of World War II.

Where do most black people live?

Cities with the highest percentage of African American people

Rank City Total African Americans
1 Detroit, MI 670,226
2 Gary, IN 75,282
4 Chester, PA 26,429
5 Miami Gardens, FL 81,776

What was the outcome of the Great Migration?

During the Great Migration, African Americans began to build a new place for themselves in public life, actively confronting racial prejudice as well as economic, political and social challenges to create a Black urban culture that would exert enormous influence in the decades to come.

What were consequences of the Great Migration?

Effects may include (old city): abandoned homes, less population, fewer businesses, increased taxes, increased cost of living. 1. Lead a class discussion on the causes and effects of the Great Migration using the guide Causes and Effects of the Great Migration on Mississippi.

What were the push and pull factors of the Great Migration?

What are the push-and-pull factors that caused the Great Migration? Economic exploitation, social terror and political disenfranchisement were the push factors. The political push factors being Jim Crow, and in particular, disenfranchisement. Black people lost the ability to vote.

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What causes migration?

People migrate for many different reasons. These reasons can be classified as economic, social, political or environmental: … political migration – moving to escape political persecution or war. environmental causes of migration include natural disasters such as flooding.

Why did many blacks migrate to the Great Plains area?

The 1862 Homestead Act, for example, opened up opportunities for African Americans just as for other Americans. … These hardships, combined with rumors of free transportation, free land, and even monetary gifts, led to a massive migration of African Americans to the Great Plains during the late 1870s.

How did the great migration affect jazz?

During the second half of the Great Migration period, commonly known as the Second Great Migration (1941-1970), musicians in Chicago created new and unique forms of jazz that both built on past developments and pushed the music into radically new directions.

Population movement